Social Indicators


  • American Time Use Survey (ATUS)--The ATUS, which is hosted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, "measures the amount of time people spend doing various activities, such as paid work, childcare, volunteering, commuting, and socializing" (to quote the homepage).The site contains data and reports for the 2003-2005 iterations of the ATUS and links to sites for time-use studies in different countries.Earlier time-use surveys for the U.S. are available via the ICPSR.
  • Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA)--The ARDA is an excellent site for numerous studies on issues of religion. There are many downloadable datasets and codebooks. Researchers should go to the "Data Archive" for a directory of the different studies available.
  • "Bowling Alone: Data"--This site hosts data used by Professor Robert Putnam in his Bowling Alone study of "social capital" in the United States. The data cover topics such as civic engagement, trust in others and in social institutions, etc. Additional relevant data for the study of social capital are available via the Saguaro Seminar on Civic Engagement in America and via the Roper Center.
  • CIA World Factbook--Excellent source of general data on all countries in the world. There are data on numerous subjects including demographics, social/political indicators, and geography.
  • Comparative Welfare States Data Set (CWSDS)--The CWSDS is a joint effort by comparative welfare-state scholars such as Evelyne Huber, Charles Ragin, John D. Stephens, and Duane Swank.The data cover 18 OECD countries from 1960 onwards and include many economic, political, and policy variables.
  • CPANDA Data Archive--The Cultural Policy & the Arts National Data Archive (CPANDA) at Princeton University allows users to download studies in its collection of data on matters pertaining to cultural policy and the arts.
  • Current Population Survey (CPS)--The Current Population Survey is a joint project between the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau. The CPS is a monthly survey that collects basic socio-demographic information and labor force characteristics. To access CPS data files, users can go through the Data Ferrett (see below). Alternately, they can go to the National Bureau of Economic Research's CPS site here or to the IPUMS CPS site here.
  • Data Ferrett--Data Ferrett is an on-line tool for extracting variables from a selection of data collections or creating tabulations and frequencies from those data. The Data Ferrett contains data from various Current Population Surveys, income studies, and health surveys.
  • Gender Info--Gender Info is "a global database of gender statistics and indicators on a wide range of policy areas, including: population, families, health, education, work, and political participation."
  • GenderStats - the Database of Gender Statistics--GenderStats is a database with international/comparative data on the status of women and includes topics such as poverty, demographics, health, and political participation. The Data Query may be particularly helpful. Bulk downloads of GenderStats data are available at http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog/gender-statistics. GenderStats is part of the Bank's Data Catalog.
  • General Social Survey (GSS)--The GSS measures public opinion in the United States on a wide variety of topics of interest to social scientists. The survey, which began in the early 1970's, provides a (nearly) annual perspective on American attitudes toward government, life, race, religion, and other social issues. The link here is to the GSS homepage within the National Opinion Research Center. Sites where researchers can extract and download specific variables of interest are listed here. The SDA Archive at Berkeley also holds GSS data from 1972 to 2010.
  • Global Market Information Database (GMID)--GMID is produced by Euromonitor International and contains time-series data (1977-present) on a very wide range of economic and social indicators such as income, GDP, consumer expenditures, and population demographics.The data are available through both Excel-ready spreadsheets and .pdf reports. GMID is also accessible via Databases at Emory.
  • Henry A. Murray Research Center--The Murray Center contains numerous datasets in the social sciences. Data in the subjects of psychology, sociology and education are highly represented.
  • International Labour Organization--The ILO is the main international labor-rights advocacy group in the world and has brought together a variety of information about labor rights and working conditions internationally.You can access their databases directly at http://www.ilo.org/public/english/support/lib/resource/ilodatabases.htm.
  • National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH)--The NSFH contains data on topics such as "the respondent's family living arrangements in childhood, departures and returns to the parental home, and histories of marriage, cohabitation, education, fertility, and employment," to quote the website.There are three waves for the NSFH - 1987-1988, 1992-1994, and 2001-2003.Data are available as SPSS files. Some NSFH data are also available via the Social Science Electronic Data Library (see below).
  • Pew Social and Demographic Trends--Pew Social and Demographic Trends "studies behaviors and attitudes of Americans in key realms of their lives, including family, community, health, finance, work and leisure." They make many of their studies available for download here. Users are required to register before downloading a dataset, but registration is free. Users should also check out the resources available via the Pew Research Center homepage.
  • PovertyNet - Data on Poverty--PovertyNet has brought together a variety of datasets pertaining to the study of poverty, income inequality, and income distribution, along with other resources relevant for international development and economics. The many potentially-useful resources listed within this site include the "Inequality Around the World" collection, the World Income Inequality Database, and PovcalNet. Be warned that addresses to World Bank sites often change without notice.
  • Social Explorer--Social Explorer provides quick and easy access to current and historical census data and demographic information. Its contents include the entire U.S. Census from 1790 to 2010, annual updates from the American Community Survey, data on religious congregations for the United States for 2009, decennial religious congregation data for 1980-2010, and carbon emissions data for 2002. Users can create reports and maps at various levels of geography, including counties, Census tracts, Census block groups, and zip codes, depending on data availability. Social Explorer is also available via Databases at Emory.
  • Social Science Electronic Data Library (SSEDL)--The Social Science Electronic Data Library is an archive of over 300 datasets covering a variety of topic areas such as Adolescent Pregnancy, Aging, AIDS/STD's, the American Family, Disability in the US, and Maternal Drug Abuse. The archive is well-indexed and allows variable-level searches. Some of the studies are also available on CD's in the Data Center. The SSEDL is also accessible via Databases at Emory..
  • Statistical Abstract of the United States--Electronic version of the popular resource. The Statistical Abstract contains a wealth of information on numerous socio-economic and demographic indicators for the US.Historical data tables taken from the Statistical Abstract are available here. There is also a CD version of the Statistical Abstract available in the Data Center.
  • UN Human Development Reports (HDR)--The HDR is an annual report from the United Nations that scores and rank countries on various indicators of "development" broadly defined. The current incarnation of the HDR provides access to both past and present reports and a variety of tools for visualization and downloading of HDR data and statistics. Data from some earlier reports are available via Carleton University's Country Indicators for Foreign Policy site.
  • University of Texas Inequality Project (UTIP)--The UTIP is devoted to the study and measure of income and earnings inequality throughout the globe.Their data holdings consist of several datasets measuring inequality between and within countries.
  • World Bank World Development Indicators (WDI)--The WDI provides convenient access to hundreds indicators on over 200 countries and territories. Data are available annually from 1960 forward, with variation across countries and indicators. The database is part of the Bank's Data Catalog of statistical databases and other data collections. The WDI is also accessible via Databases at Emory and on CD-ROM in the Data Center.